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Child, Youth, & Family Services

    Results: 20

  • Adoption Counseling and Support (1)
    PH-0300.0300

    Adoption Counseling and Support

    PH-0300.0300

    Programs that provide guidance and support for people who have adopted a child or are involved in the process of adopting a child.
  • Adoption Services (2)
    PH-0300

    Adoption Services

    PH-0300

    Programs that participate in arranging permanent homes under new legal parentage for individuals whose birth parents are unable or unwilling to provide for their care. Included are programs that provide counseling and assistance for people who decide to relinquish their children for adoption or arrange for an independent adoption; which recruit, select, counsel and match suitable adoptive parents with children who have been relinquished; which assist in the adoption of stepchildren, adults or foreign-born children; which provide foster care for children who have been relinquished for adoption but not yet placed; and/or which assist people who are adopted to locate their birth parents and birth parents to locate the children they relinquished.
  • Adoption/Foster Care Issues (1)
    YZ-0200

    Adoption/Foster Care Issues

    YZ-0200

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topics of adoption and/or foster care as well as foster care transition.
  • Breastfeeding Individuals (1)
    YJ-0920

    Breastfeeding Individuals

    YJ-0920

    Individuals who have needs and interests in common because they are nursing an infant or are pregnant and intend to breastfeed once they give birth.
  • Breastfeeding Support Programs (1)
    LJ-5000.1000

    Breastfeeding Support Programs

    LJ-5000.1000

    Programs that provide information and instruction concerning appropriate techniques for nursing an infant for expectant parents or new mothers.
  • Child Support Assistance/Enforcement (1)
    FT-3000.1600

    Child Support Assistance/Enforcement

    FT-3000.1600

    Programs that provide assistance which helps to ensure that parents fulfill their mutual obligation to financially support and provide health care for their children. Included are services for people who want to locate an absent parent; establish paternity; establish a child support order; request that the non-custodial parent provide health insurance for a child in conjunction with a child support order; change the amount of a child support award; dispute a child support award; or enforce payment of child support monies in cases where the supporting parent is delinquent in paying or refuses to pay or make health insurance arrangements altogether. Child support is money paid by one parent to another for the maintenance, including the education, of their children following the dissolution of their marriage or other relationship. Non-custodial parents enrolled in an insurance plan at work may be required to include the child under this coverage while those not covered by any insurance plan may be required to obtain medical coverage, if available at a reasonable cost. Child support assistance/enforcement may be provided by private attorneys, legal clinics, family law facilitators' offices or child support enforcement programs which are available in all states, often as a component of the district attorney's office.
  • Children's Library Services (1)
    TJ-4500.1500

    Children's Library Services

    TJ-4500.1500

    Libraries that offer special programs to acquaint children with library services and encourage them to read.
  • Family Based Services (2)
    PH-2360

    Family Based Services

    PH-2360

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support healthy family development, improve the family's ability to resolve problems (such as poverty, unemployment, ill health, homelessness, substandard housing, educational difficulties, substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, delinquency and physical and developmental problems) and prevent the need for unnecessary placement of children in foster care, group homes, inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment programs, residential training schools or other alternative environments when family problems reach crisis proportions. Services may include home visiting services that focus on public health issues (especially prenatal), mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, success in a child care setting, parenting skills development, stress management, tutoring, pregnancy awareness and AIDS awareness; may be available to the community at large, to families at risk for dissolution or those currently in crisis; and may be offered by a single agency or a coalition of agencies that have agreed to provide services according to a coordinated case plan.
  • Family Support Centers/Outreach (1)
    PH-2360.2400

    Family Support Centers/Outreach

    PH-2360.2400

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support the healthy development of families, improve family interaction skills and help fragile families to resolve their problems at a pre-crisis stage before they become unmanageable. Services may be center-based or provided on an outreach basis to families who are initially reluctant to seek support and generally target the specific needs of a particular community. Included may be self-sufficiency programs which help families break the cycle of poverty by addressing the barriers to self-sufficiency; early child development and school success programs; programs which address the needs of teen parents; programs which target parents at risk for becoming abusive; programs for families with children who have special developmental needs and programs that focus on the maternal and child health care needs of first-time, expectant women whose babies are at high risk for low birth weight and infant mortality.
  • Foster Grandparent Program (1)
    ND-9200.8000-200

    Foster Grandparent Program

    ND-9200.8000-200

    Programs that provide part-time opportunities for low-income individuals age 55 and older to serve as mentors, tutors and caregivers for abused or neglected children, troubled youth, or youngsters with disabilities or other special needs in schools, hospitals, child care programs, Head Start programs and residential settings. Foster grandparents receive a modest tax-free stipend for their work as well as reimbursements for their travel expenses, and have the satisfaction of helping young people grow, gain confidence, and become more productive members of society. Local nonprofit organizations and public agencies receive grants to sponsor and operate local Foster Grandparent projects. The Foster Grandparents Program is part of Senior Corps, a network of programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
  • Grandparents (1)
    YK-6500.2500

    Grandparents

    YK-6500.2500

    The mother or father of an individual's parents.
  • Independent Living Skills Instruction (4)
    LR-3200

    Independent Living Skills Instruction

    LR-3200

    Programs that assist people who have disabilities to learn the basic skills of daily living through individual and group counseling and instruction, experience and practice in coping with real or simulated life situational demands; or through the use of assistive devices, special equipment and specialized assistants. Services include but are not limited to training in the ability to travel about the community alone; to live independently in a private residence; to maintain health through self-care and use of medical services; to live within personal income; to maintain acceptable grooming and appearance; to deal with legal, family or social problems; and to cope with other requirements for successful independent living.
  • Life Skills Education (2)
    PH-6200.4600

    Life Skills Education

    PH-6200.4600

    Programs that offer training which focuses on the knowledge and skills an individual may need to live independently or make a successful transition to independent living. Participants may include runaway youth who are living on their own, youth who because of age can no longer be maintained in foster care, new widows, victims of domestic abuse, people who have previously been homeless, and others who have lived in an environment in which decision making and responsibilities of daily living have been handled by another as well as people currently living independently who want to be more effective. Training may address job search and retention, money management, insurance, taxes, rental agreements, vehicle purchase, nutrition, home management, health care, legal emancipation for teens and other similar topics.
  • Patient/Family Support Services (1)
    LH-6300

    Patient/Family Support Services

    LH-6300

    Programs that provide support services for patients and their families. Included are offices in hospitals or medical clinics that provide advocacy, social work services, or assistance related to admissions or billing; temporary housing for patients/families; mercy flights; morale boosting activities; and other services that support the ability of patients and their families to cope with illness.
  • Personal Enrichment (5)
    PH-6200

    Personal Enrichment

    PH-6200

    Programs that provide assistance for people who want to enhance their lives and achieve their potential as individuals through analysis of life goals, evaluation of lifestyles and relationships, elimination of unnecessary stress and modification of behavior and attitudes to facilitate achievement of personal objectives.
  • Pregnancy Testing (1)
    LJ-2000.6750

    Pregnancy Testing

    LJ-2000.6750

    Programs that utilize laboratory procedures to determine whether an individual is pregnant or which provide access to devices for establishing pregnancy that people can use at home.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines (1)
    RP-1500.1400-700

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines

    RP-1500.1400-700

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk of abuse. Included may be steps to ensure the youth's safety, information regarding the youth's rights and alternatives, and referrals for shelter, medical care, ongoing counseling or group support and other related services. Also included are programs that maintain a message relay system which allows runaways to contact their parents or other concerned individuals and receive messages from them. Helpline staff are generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text.
  • Wellness Programs for Youth (1)
    LH-2700.9500 * YB-9500

    Wellness Programs * Youth

    LH-2700.9500 * YB-9500

    Programs that offer individual and/or group sessions which assist participants to understand how their lifestyle impacts their physical and mental health and to develop personal practices that enhance their total well-being. Wellness programs are holistic and combine a variety of components which may include a general physical examination that is tailored to the individual's needs; an evaluation of the person's pattern of exercise, eating habits, sources of stress and other lifestyle elements that are potential risk factors; and the development and implementation of an individualized plan for prevention management and early intervention to optimize health and performance which may include physical fitness sessions, nutrition counseling, stress reduction techniques, biofeedback, practice in assuming responsibility for one's choices, and other specific measures for avoiding physical and mental health problems. * Individuals who are younger than age 18.
  • Youth Court Volunteer Opportunities (1)
    PX-1850.9500

    Youth Court Volunteer Opportunities

    PX-1850.9500

    Organizations that are actively seeking youth to serve as staff in Teen Court and act as the attorneys, bailiffs, clerks and jurors on a voluntary basis without remuneration. Volunteer jurors hear cases involving other teens and determine the consequences for the individual and the community if a guilty verdict is reached. Training is provided prior to service.
  • Youth Courts (1)
    FC-9500

    Youth Courts

    FC-9500

    Courts which serve as an alternative to Juvenile Justice Courts for youth younger than age 16 who have committed minor delinquent and status offenses or exhibit other problem behaviors. Youth whose cases are heard in youth courts are judged, convicted or exonerated and sentenced by their peers. Variously known as teen, peer, and student courts, youth courts can be administered by and operated by a variety of agencies within a community including law enforcement agencies, juvenile probation departments, juvenile courts, private nonprofit agencies and schools.